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We write about, and curate, World War II history on Tumblr. When freedom and democracy were in peril, an entire generation answered the call. It may be hard for us to imagine, but our grandparents and great-grandparents - when they were young like us - put aside their youth to save the world less than a lifetime ago. They still refuse to be called heroes. The least you can do is post a photo in their honor!

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In The Pacific

  • July 24, 2014 3:40 PM
    Japanese plane shot down in Pacific testifying to the accuracy of Navy anti-aircraft fire. Streaming smoke and flame in its wake, the Japanese plane is snapped as it plummets into the Pacific. In the foreground of the picture are wire installations of the carrier. 24 July 1944. View high resolution

    Japanese plane shot down in Pacific testifying to the accuracy of Navy anti-aircraft fire. Streaming smoke and flame in its wake, the Japanese plane is snapped as it plummets into the Pacific. In the foreground of the picture are wire installations of the carrier. 24 July 1944.

    (Source: ww2online.org)

  • July 7, 2014 6:20 PM
    July 8, 1943. Health Haven in the Pacific. Behind the far-flung ‘line of battle’ on the South Pacific front the Navy has established an oasis of peace and quiet where battered bodies and jangled nerves can be nursed back to health. Performing a near-miracle from the point of time and labor expended, construction battalions have erected docking facilities and an air field whereby casualties can be received from battlefields. For healthy but nerve wracked personnel, the Fleet Recreation Center is a Mecca also——one spot on the war bound deep that is truly Pacific, where death can be forgotten for a brief hour in the sun. Keep it flying —- Brawny fighting men forget the worries of war for awhile as they engage in a spirited game of volleyball at Fleet Recreation center. Courts were built by the men themselves with cement provided by the Navy.
U.S. Navy Official photograph, Gift of Charles Ives, from the collection of The National WWII Museum.

    July 8, 1943. Health Haven in the Pacific. Behind the far-flung ‘line of battle’ on the South Pacific front the Navy has established an oasis of peace and quiet where battered bodies and jangled nerves can be nursed back to health. Performing a near-miracle from the point of time and labor expended, construction battalions have erected docking facilities and an air field whereby casualties can be received from battlefields. For healthy but nerve wracked personnel, the Fleet Recreation Center is a Mecca also——one spot on the war bound deep that is truly Pacific, where death can be forgotten for a brief hour in the sun. Keep it flying —- Brawny fighting men forget the worries of war for awhile as they engage in a spirited game of volleyball at Fleet Recreation center. Courts were built by the men themselves with cement provided by the Navy.

    U.S. Navy Official photograph, Gift of Charles Ives, from the collection of The National WWII Museum.

    (Source: ww2online.org)

  • 3:40 PM
    A U. S. Navy submarine returned to port with this photographic evidence of the accuracy of its attack on a Japanese cargo ship somewhere in the Pacific. Snapped through the periscope, the photograph dramatically records the death throes of the enemy ship as it lists towards a watery grave in a welter of black smoke on 7 July 1944. View high resolution

    A U. S. Navy submarine returned to port with this photographic evidence of the accuracy of its attack on a Japanese cargo ship somewhere in the Pacific. Snapped through the periscope, the photograph dramatically records the death throes of the enemy ship as it lists towards a watery grave in a welter of black smoke on 7 July 1944.

    (Source: ww2online.org)

  • May 1, 2014 9:16 AM
    obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Oldest Living FBI Agent, Olympian, and Marine
Walter R. Walsh was a legend. He served as an FBI agent during the 1930s, when the gangsters were more famous than the lawmen. He re-established and trained the Marine Scout Snipers during World War II. He even participated in the 1948 Olympic Games. And he lived for 106 years.
Mr. Walsh joined the FBI in 1934, a 27-year-old Rutgers law school grad. His class was the first to be armed, and among that group he stood out. Since his teens Mr. Walsh had earned dozens of awards and prizes for his skill with a pistol and rifle. It was that skill that put him in the field handling some of the FBI’s most dangerous cases.
During his ten years with the Bureau, Mr. Walsh shot and killed 11 known criminals. The most breathtaking story involved “Public Enemy Number One” Al Brady who, along with associates James Dalhover and Clarence Lee Shaffer, was wanted for four murders and 200 robberies.
On October 12, 1937, Mr. Walsh was working undercover at a sporting goods store in Bangor, Maine waiting for the trio to return to pick up Thompson sub-machine guns they had purchased. Mr. Dalhover walked into the store first and Walsh immediately arrested him. Informed that the other two were right outside, Mr. Walsh went to open the door and realized he was staring directly at Mr. Shaffer.
Both men opened fire simultaneously shattering the door’s plate glass. Mr. Walsh was hit three times including in the chest and his right hand, which also destroyed one of two guns he was carrying. Mr. Shaffer was wounded as well.
Al Brady, seeing what was happening, began opening fire and even though severely wounded Mr. Walsh shot at Brady although with dozens of other FBI agents who had surrounded the store. Witnesses later testified that they saw Mr. Walsh put the final bullet into Mr. Brady who was writhing on the ground.
Mr. Walsh had other, less violent run-ins with some of the more notorious criminals of the era. He and a his partner discovered the body of “Baby Face” Nelson in Skokie, Illinois in November 1934. Mr. Nelson was mortally wounded while firing on and killing two FBI agents earlier in the day.
Just two months later, Mr. Walsh arrested “Doc” Barker, one of Ma Barker’s sons. Mr. Walsh asked Mr. Barker if he had a gun and the kidnapper and murdered admitted that he left it in his apartment saying “Ain’t that a hell of a place for it?” Mr. Walsh replied, “No, you were lucky.”
In 1942, Mr. Walsh left the FBI and joined the Marines. Although the Bureau needed agents during World War II, Mr. Walsh felt his skills as a marksman were more valuable to the military. Having served in the Marine Corps Reserves - in order to compete in shooting competitions - Mr. Walsh was commissioned as a lieutenant and ordered to re-form and train the Marine Scout Snipers. For two years, Mr. Walsh helped transform young non-commissioned officers into some of the greatest shooters in the world. But it wasn’t enough for Mr. Walsh who wanted to be at the front lines.
In 1944 he was shipped to the Pacific theater and participated in the invasion of Okinawa. His legendary shooting prowess showed itself throughout the battle especially when he killed a Japanese sniper with his .45 automatic pistol from 80 yards. 
He left the Marines at the end of the war having attained the rank of colonel. Returning to the FBI he received a cool welcome for having left to serve in the war and resigned after two additional years of service. He re-enlisted in the Marine Corps.
Throughout all of this Mr. Walsh continued to pile up awards and citations for his sharpshooting. He won FBI and Marine Corps shooting competitions and made the U.S. Olympic team. He made the 1948 U.S. Olympic team and traveled to London the 1948 Games, the first in 12 years. He finished in 12th place in the 50m free pistol competition. 
Mr. Walsh fully retired from the Marines in 1970 having commanded the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines and the Weapons Training Battalion in Quantico, Virginia.
Even into his 80s, Mr. Walsh continued to participate in shooting competitions, serving as captain for the U.S. team at the 1994 World Muzzleloading Championships. He kept his shooting eye as he aged hitting 10 of 15 clay pigeons in a skeet shooting session with a reporter…a few weeks after he turned 100. 
In 2008, Mr. Walsh was honored at the FBI’s 100th anniversary as the Bureau’s oldest living agent - who was also older than the agency itself. During an NPR interview that same year he was asked the secret to his longevity: “To start with, you have to be lucky. Then, if you listen to your parents and follow the path of the straight and narrow, then I think God has mercy on you — permits you to live. That’s about it. It has worked very well for me for a long time.”
Walter R. Walsh, who honed his shooting skills by knocking clothespins off his grandmother’s wash line with a BB gun, died on April 29, 2014 at the age of 106. He was 5 days shy of his 107th birthday.
Sources: NY Times, NPR, American Rifleman, and Wikipedia
(Image of Walter R. Walsh, undated but circa World War II, is courtesy of USA Shooting.)
View high resolution

    obitoftheday:

    Obit of the Day: Oldest Living FBI Agent, Olympian, and Marine

    Walter R. Walsh was a legend. He served as an FBI agent during the 1930s, when the gangsters were more famous than the lawmen. He re-established and trained the Marine Scout Snipers during World War II. He even participated in the 1948 Olympic Games. And he lived for 106 years.

    Mr. Walsh joined the FBI in 1934, a 27-year-old Rutgers law school grad. His class was the first to be armed, and among that group he stood out. Since his teens Mr. Walsh had earned dozens of awards and prizes for his skill with a pistol and rifle. It was that skill that put him in the field handling some of the FBI’s most dangerous cases.

    During his ten years with the Bureau, Mr. Walsh shot and killed 11 known criminals. The most breathtaking story involved “Public Enemy Number One” Al Brady who, along with associates James Dalhover and Clarence Lee Shaffer, was wanted for four murders and 200 robberies.

    On October 12, 1937, Mr. Walsh was working undercover at a sporting goods store in Bangor, Maine waiting for the trio to return to pick up Thompson sub-machine guns they had purchased. Mr. Dalhover walked into the store first and Walsh immediately arrested him. Informed that the other two were right outside, Mr. Walsh went to open the door and realized he was staring directly at Mr. Shaffer.

    Both men opened fire simultaneously shattering the door’s plate glass. Mr. Walsh was hit three times including in the chest and his right hand, which also destroyed one of two guns he was carrying. Mr. Shaffer was wounded as well.

    Al Brady, seeing what was happening, began opening fire and even though severely wounded Mr. Walsh shot at Brady although with dozens of other FBI agents who had surrounded the store. Witnesses later testified that they saw Mr. Walsh put the final bullet into Mr. Brady who was writhing on the ground.

    Mr. Walsh had other, less violent run-ins with some of the more notorious criminals of the era. He and a his partner discovered the body of “Baby Face” Nelson in Skokie, Illinois in November 1934. Mr. Nelson was mortally wounded while firing on and killing two FBI agents earlier in the day.

    Just two months later, Mr. Walsh arrested “Doc” Barker, one of Ma Barker’s sons. Mr. Walsh asked Mr. Barker if he had a gun and the kidnapper and murdered admitted that he left it in his apartment saying “Ain’t that a hell of a place for it?” Mr. Walsh replied, “No, you were lucky.”

    In 1942, Mr. Walsh left the FBI and joined the Marines. Although the Bureau needed agents during World War II, Mr. Walsh felt his skills as a marksman were more valuable to the military. Having served in the Marine Corps Reserves - in order to compete in shooting competitions - Mr. Walsh was commissioned as a lieutenant and ordered to re-form and train the Marine Scout Snipers. For two years, Mr. Walsh helped transform young non-commissioned officers into some of the greatest shooters in the world. But it wasn’t enough for Mr. Walsh who wanted to be at the front lines.

    In 1944 he was shipped to the Pacific theater and participated in the invasion of Okinawa. His legendary shooting prowess showed itself throughout the battle especially when he killed a Japanese sniper with his .45 automatic pistol from 80 yards. 

    He left the Marines at the end of the war having attained the rank of colonel. Returning to the FBI he received a cool welcome for having left to serve in the war and resigned after two additional years of service. He re-enlisted in the Marine Corps.

    Throughout all of this Mr. Walsh continued to pile up awards and citations for his sharpshooting. He won FBI and Marine Corps shooting competitions and made the U.S. Olympic team. He made the 1948 U.S. Olympic team and traveled to London the 1948 Games, the first in 12 years. He finished in 12th place in the 50m free pistol competition. 

    Mr. Walsh fully retired from the Marines in 1970 having commanded the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines and the Weapons Training Battalion in Quantico, Virginia.

    Even into his 80s, Mr. Walsh continued to participate in shooting competitions, serving as captain for the U.S. team at the 1994 World Muzzleloading Championships. He kept his shooting eye as he aged hitting 10 of 15 clay pigeons in a skeet shooting session with a reporter…a few weeks after he turned 100. 

    In 2008, Mr. Walsh was honored at the FBI’s 100th anniversary as the Bureau’s oldest living agent - who was also older than the agency itself. During an NPR interview that same year he was asked the secret to his longevity: “To start with, you have to be lucky. Then, if you listen to your parents and follow the path of the straight and narrow, then I think God has mercy on you — permits you to live. That’s about it. It has worked very well for me for a long time.”

    Walter R. Walsh, who honed his shooting skills by knocking clothespins off his grandmother’s wash line with a BB gun, died on April 29, 2014 at the age of 106. He was 5 days shy of his 107th birthday.

    Sources: NY Times, NPR, American Rifleman, and Wikipedia

    (Image of Walter R. Walsh, undated but circa World War II, is courtesy of USA Shooting.)

  • April 14, 2014 7:00 PM
    Film actor Joe E. Brown autographs a 1,000-pound bomb, ‘“To Tojo from Joe,’” and says, “There, boys, is the address with U.S. forces somewhere in New Guinea on April 15, 1943. Now go and deliver it.”” He is with the crew of the heavy B-24 bomber which is named “”Yanks from Hell.”” (AP Photo) View high resolution

    Film actor Joe E. Brown autographs a 1,000-pound bomb, ‘“To Tojo from Joe,’” and says, “There, boys, is the address with U.S. forces somewhere in New Guinea on April 15, 1943. Now go and deliver it.”” He is with the crew of the heavy B-24 bomber which is named “”Yanks from Hell.”” (AP Photo)

    (Source: anorak.co.uk)

In the seventeenth chapter of Saint Luke it is written 'the kingdom of God is within man.” Not one man, nor a group of men, but in all men. In you, the people. You the people have the power, the power to create machines, the power to create happiness. You the people have the power to make life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure. - Charlie Chaplin

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