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We write about, and curate, World War II history on Tumblr. When freedom and democracy were in peril, an entire generation answered the call. It may be hard for us to imagine, but our grandparents and great-grandparents - when they were young like us - put aside their youth to save the world less than a lifetime ago. They still refuse to be called heroes. The least you can do is post a photo in their honor!

Women At War

Propaganda

Must See

Combat

Across Europe

In The Pacific

  • September 11, 2014 5:02 PM

    This morning we were visited by artifact donors from Texas who made the trip to New Orleans to share material with the Museum. We sat and went through the collection together, looking over the service material from Albert Dean Bryant from Midland, Texas. Bryant served with the 87th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron of the 7th Armored Division. Seventy years prior to his daughter’s visit, on 11 September 1944, Bryant wrote a letter home to his family. He describes the weariness and restlessness of battle, “There are things that happen over here which takes complete control over your mind…”

    He writes of running remaining Germans out of French towns and the liberation of those towns: The aftermath was something which almost made the danger & unpleasant things we had to endure worth it—People by the hundreds standing in the streets with hands upraised & shouting & laughing & crying with appreciation for being liberated—Bottles of wine and champagne (which would cost $20.00 in the US) were freely given to us as we went through the streets (bottles which had dirt & dust on them to show they had been buried or hidden for years from the greedy Boche).

    A little over one month later, on 27 October 1944, Bryant was captured and would spend the remainder of the war as a POW of the Germans.

    Interested in learning more about donating artifacts to the Museum? See our information on how to Donate an Artifact.

    Post by Curator Kimberly Guise.

    (Source: bit.ly)

  • 1:40 PM
    usnatarchives:

A young woman is seen here selling war bonds and stamps, and she distributes War Production Drive literature to help promote the war effort. The other women surrounding the stand are wearing the shirtwaist dress, a very popular style during the 40s. It got its name because it is a blouse top and a skirt bottom combined into one dress. The shirtwaist dress was all about comfort—it flared just enough to be loose over the hips and wide enough for easy walking. Because the dress was also light on fabric quantity, it met the rationing restrictions during the war years. Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. National Archives Identifier: 196483
View high resolution

    usnatarchives:

    A young woman is seen here selling war bonds and stamps, and she distributes War Production Drive literature to help promote the war effort. The other women surrounding the stand are wearing the shirtwaist dress, a very popular style during the 40s. It got its name because it is a blouse top and a skirt bottom combined into one dress. The shirtwaist dress was all about comfort—it flared just enough to be loose over the hips and wide enough for easy walking. Because the dress was also light on fabric quantity, it met the rationing restrictions during the war years. Courtesy of Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. National Archives Identifier: 196483

  • September 10, 2014 1:40 PM

    Adult Learning Webinar on September 18th

    Join curator Kimberly Guise from The National WWII Museum as she provides an inside look at the 442nd Regimental Combat Team/ 100th Infantry Battalion and the Military Intelligence Service from the Museum’s current special exhibit, From Barbed Wire to Battlefields: Japanese American Experiences in WWII. Participants will have an up close view of artifacts and oral histories from the Museum’s collection that convey both the triumphs and struggles of these 33,000 Japanese Americans who served their country in Europe and the Pacific.  Participants will explore the stories of Joseph Takata, the first Japanese American killed in battle, Medic and POW Jimmie Kanaya, and former Senator and Medal of Honor recipient Daniel Inouye.

    This webinar is free for Museum members and $10 for non-members. All you need to participate is a computer with a high-speed internet connection, so register for it today!

    The Military Achievements and Challenges of Japanese Americans in WWII
    with Curator Kimberly Guise
    Thursday, September 18th at 12:00pm CT

    (Source: nww2m.com)

  • September 9, 2014 5:20 PM
    ucsdspecialcollections:

What this country needs is a good mental insecticide, published by PM Magazine on June 11, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230
View high resolution

    ucsdspecialcollections:

    What this country needs is a good mental insecticide, published by PM Magazine on June 11, 1942, Dr. Seuss Collection, MSS 230

  • September 8, 2014 5:20 PM
    usnatarchives:

"Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

    usnatarchives:

    "Jenny on the Job" was a series of posters issued by the Public Health Services in 1943 created by artist Kula Robbins. This specific poster is titled "Jenny on the Job - Wears styles designed for victory", depicting what women working in the factories and around machines were expected to wear. In today’s Pieces of History post, you can read more about how women’s pivotal role in the workforce during WWII greatly influence the fashion trends of the decade. National Archives Identifier: 514684.

In the seventeenth chapter of Saint Luke it is written 'the kingdom of God is within man.” Not one man, nor a group of men, but in all men. In you, the people. You the people have the power, the power to create machines, the power to create happiness. You the people have the power to make life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure. - Charlie Chaplin

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